118 – Interview with Nick Loper – Side Hustle Nation

 

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Article Link: http://simplepassivecashflow.com/118-interview-nick-loper-side-hustle-nation/

Text “simple” to 314-665-1767 to download the Hui Google Drive files and the 2018 Rental Property Analyzer

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Pardon the grammar – I’m an Engeneer, Enginere, Engenere… I’m good with math!

________Here are the Show Notes________

Started side hustling with footwear comparison shopping website while working in Corporate America.

Some projects worked; some didn’t. Side Hustle Nation blog and podcast still exists and going strong.

Stuck on bottom rung of Fortune 50 company with no direct results to effort you put in.

“Hustle Time” after 9-5 and weekends.

Prioritize one thing for your business that is proactive accomplish it the next day before going into reactive mode.

Set up “Theme Days” to be more efficient.

Listening to radio is a waste of time. Used audiobooks and podcasts as own coaching.

Accountability from peer and mastermind groups keeps you hustling.

Purchasing a rental is an accepted, passive side hustle you can likely be public about.

Side hustles weren’t huge secrets. 44 million Americans have income on the side anyway.

Real Estate Investing at moment are through REITs, Fundrise, Peerstreet. Focus on what you know and willing to do.

Need to start side hustle and business to get bigger returns v. real estate investing.

Visit www.sidehustlenation.com. For part-time ideas, visit www.sidehustlenation.com/ideas.

Backward Engineering Happiness

Life is funny, about the time you achieve something you realize that there is something else to go after.

When I was going after that magic number “10” single family homes I was all consumed by the chase. Then when I got there the next goal was 1,000 units. Got there and it was the same result. Taking a step back I realized that happiness was not about getting to a magic number or properties or money (although it is a great way to keep score).

I wanted to get back home to Hawai after 14 years of living in Seattle. Done! (And you can see why by visiting)

For a long time, I have written down my “I would be happy when…” or IWBHW’s and they always change and I am always chasing the next thing. Not until recently did I realize that it was not about the chase to the next goal but embracing and enjoying or the Journey… Follow along on mine.

We all have heard about the Gallup article that said that once someone has $75,000 of income a year their happiness does not grow by leaps and bounds. I’m not here to debunk it but to ask why and more importantly how can I apply it?

I have built up a large network of other investors who have enough “simple passive cashflow” and the common thought pattern switches from making money to getting back time and living a more fulfilled life.

These days I ponder… how I can hack happiness? After all, more money won’t make that much difference. (Although I would like a Mercedes Tesla)

I tried using Maslow’s hierarchy as a framework to dissect happiness but I have found it to be a little too bit “basic” as it applies more to those in third world countries and people with real problems in life. I don’t want to sound basic I mostly have “first world problems” which I am very grateful for.

In 2016, I went down to Texas to attend a Tony Robbins seminar and discovered my current framework to backward engineer happiness.

Mr. Robbins outlines six human needs:

1)         Growth

2)         Contribution

3)         Significance

4)         Uncertainty

5)         Certainty

6)         Love and Connection

 

The lowest on the spectrum of human needs is to be Loved/Connection. I talk to so many people in my free investor calls and it is very apprent who are givers and who are takers. Why do people act so selfishly and so seriously? Perhaps it takes an old soul to realize it but in the end relationship that we build on the journey are what really matter and what we will cherish. (per Ray Dalio)

Action item: How can I get more Love/Connection? Schedule it? Attract more people of that nature? Create a podcast and network of other like-minded investors.

Certainty and Uncertainty are complete opposites. Certainty is having a reliable and safe life but at some point, we thirst for spontaneity.

Action item: How can I get more Certainty/Uncertainty? How do I build a routine? How do I put myself in places to get lucky? How do I free myself to go on more controlled impulses?

Significance is about feeling special.

Action item: What do I do that is my competitive advantage? Where can I get praise?

Contribution is about aligning your life’s work for the benefit of others. A mission. Apparently, Mr. Robbins did not endorse the mission of sitting on a beach with an unlimited supply of piña coladas and taking food porn pictures while gallivanting the world as a tourist. Nor did he support playing it safe with a bunch of passive investments.

Action item: What has been your biggest pain point growing up and maybe you can help others? What pisses you off most in this world? Realize that you might have to take a bit of monetary risk here to make a bigger impact.

Why do you think I accept non-accredited investors into my projects? Not because I love being super careful to follow SEC regulations. Certainly not because I have to expend so much energy to educate non-accredited investor and they invest all their money in just a couple deals. I do it because the middle-class non-accredited investors who go to work every day need these types of investments the most and damn it, I’m going to do that because it’s the right thing to do.

And the final need is Growth. Improving as a person.

Action item: Think about the different aspects of you life (physical, relationships, money, spiritual, to name a few), which ones need work? Many call this the wheel. I call it a stool (four pillars: health, relationships, spiritual, money/business) because I try to make things simple.

Tony Robbins six needs is a great starting point to see how we can increase our happiness. If you really think about these are the things that really make us happy. Lets us put focus on what makes us happy because in the end, that is what really matters. And the score of the game 😉

In another study, researchers asked 10,000 people to list 10 happy moments. This generated a corpus of 100,000 happy moments called HappyDB.

Here are the patterns that came up.

 

Here is where the team/comradary componet came into play…

Complete study write up.

Too often passive cashflow is associated with scammy multi-level marketing ploys to get people who don’t have the money in the first place to buy into expensive education systems. If the goal was to just make money and not to create value there are many things you could do such as sell drugs or sell a testicle.

“Hey man… let me tell you about passive cashflow and how you can get rich with little to no effort… do you feel that… its called entropy man!” (In a sleazy tone)

As mentioned before SPC-1.0 is getting into the rental property game and getting your mindset out of the Dave Ramsey/Millionaire Next Door lizard brain where you are just focused on putting food on the table and making ends meet. As you build up your cashflow you move from more scarcity mindset to abundance mindset.

SPC-2.0 is turning into more of a passive investors as I have traded my single family home rentals to more scalable limit partnership positions in syndications, and now after I have cashflow (food on the table) I can take some risks and go after SPC-3.0 which is Simple Passion Income.

Being a working W2 professional I have a soft spot for those in my position… It makes no sense for a computer engineer who has a family and working 50 hours a week at a $200K W2 job to do what is required to become an operational lead on an apartment deal. Doing such would require 12-18 months of relentless work without monetary gain and little success to build relationships with brokers, travel to the markets.. and put up hard money to close the deal.. I have tried to make a team atmosphere where talented professionals can dip their toes in to “scratch their entrepreneur itch” yet keep their regular salaries.

“Entrepreneurship is all about you! A job is more about sucking up and politics.”

All too often the entrepreneurs out there reaching success are not those who possess the skillsets but they just went after it and got lucky. Don’t get me wrong they deserve it because of all the sacrifices but imagine if you combined that grit with talent?

Ikigai is the alignment of doing something that is 1) you passion, 2) makes money, 3) you are good at and 4) good for the world. When you get this it is like arranging the Infinity Stones on the gauntlet and a higher level of achievement and happiness.

What is SPC-4.0? Maybe mentoring the next generation but at that point, we are playing with house money!

“What do I love to do and get paid to do it” Russell Grey or the Real Estate Guys Radio show.

The pursuit of an entrepreneur dream is not for everyone.

It requires an investment in time and money. And whenever you make an investment, you take on risk. In this case its taking time and energy away from a day job that already makes a lot of money.

In order to get enough critical mass behind an idea to turn into a thriving business, you must devote time, often many years. There are no guarantees that your efforts will be rewarded a lot of time luck is required. This Time Risk is that all of your time will be for nothing.

The saying “good is the enemy of great” comes to mind here. For many high paid working professional, you make enough money to be happy but part of what we are going for is not the extra wealth but “passion income.” Feeding that entrepreneur itch or as Buck Joffrey says that primal to our core instincts.

 

 

Except from the 12+ Time Best Selling Book:

The One Thing That Changed Everything: The Engineer Who Escaped the Rat Race and Achieved Escape Velocity

I walked the linear path for much of my life. Raised as part of the disappearing “middle-class” programmed me to study hard in school, checking the boxes on extracurricular activities, cramming for the SATs, and getting a high GPA to get into college, all to live a “practical” life.

Growing up, we were told to “waste nothing” and turn off the lights every time you leave a room. I still feel guilty to order a soft drink at a restaurant as opposed to tap water.

In college, while other cohorts were playing Frisbee in the quad, I was stuck in the basement of the industrial engineering lab. Why was I not playing the sun? Because Google told me what the highest paid undergraduate professions were. Driving on autopilot for much of my early twenties, I went for a higher-level master’s degree and tested to become professionally licensed as an engineer for the job security.

Upon entering corporate America, I spent my first five years of my career working for a for-profit, private company as a construction supervisor managing a bunch of entitled journeymen who were older than my parents. Facing the rigors of junior level employment, I played my role as the young guy, traveling 100% of the time for my company, sacrificing quality of life, as I navigated the operational clusters, toxic management, and other backstabbing pawns in the company.

I have a lot of scar tissue from that decade of working for the man not to mention building someone else’s dream. You tell me how engaged you would be if meeting protocol was to sit next to your superior and not speak unless directly instructed to or if you were asked to address a director two levels up by mister or misses!

One day an internal company email went out notifying of a friend/ex-direct report had died in a work accident. My boss was uncompassionate about the situation, looking out for the big bad machine first (mostly his annual bonus and agenda). This really put things into perspective for me.

As a corporate road warrior, it was novel being on company expenses all the time and maxing out on airline and hotel points, but you can only have steak and lobster so many times… The only people who cared about my platinum status were the other suckers in first class who were working for the paycheck or an acceptable quarterly review. Although I am grateful that I had a well-paying job post-2008 recession, I traded the most important resource, time, for money.

The linear path instilled delayed gratification, living below my means, and an overall scarcity mentality of saving money instead of earning more, being more. I was entranced by the pervasive Wall Street marketing to blindly put money into a company sponsored 401K plan only to “hope and pray” that compound interest would carry me to a secure retirement.

Let’s not even talk about the student loans I had…

I knew where this path was going…I mean I did the math and it told me so. This is my story of how I freed myself financially, how I took ownership of my life’s direction, and the series of events that allowed me to find my calling.

 

Seeing the (Economic) Matrix

A steady diet of ramen noodles and a free birthday latte per year made it possible in 2009 to purchase my own home to live in. Being a bachelor who was only home on the weekends, I realized that having this large home was a waste of money. I made a decision to rent it out and became a real real estate investor. You might be thinking that this was the big change, but at the time it was simply a lot of beer money after collecting the rents and paying the mortgage.

I don’t know if it was the beer or being love drunk with cash flow, but I opted out of the linear path in my early twenties.

From that point on I devoured podcasts, books, and online forums on every keyword iteration of passive real estate investing. At a few hundred dollars of passive cash flow per home, the process was simple, buy a rental property where the income exceeded the expenses and mortgage, then rinse, wash, and repeat. Like a space shuttle that accelerates through gravity and escapes the atmosphere into Zero-G, this was my way to financial freedom. Up to that point, the biggest breakthrough in my life was discovering the .MP3 format that compressed and played music digitally in my teens. Using this intellectual technology, I progressed intentionally to eleven rentals in 2016.

At that time, a few of my friends wondered why my ramen noodle diet was being replaced by Starbucks coffee and yummy double bacon and egg breakfast sandwiches. They wanted a piece of the action too. Duh, it was about time seven years later, said the little red hen who did all the work by herself…. As much as I liked helping people, I got tired of answering the same questions. So what does any other late Gen-X/Millennial do but start a blog? Unfortunately, the words I write, even if spelled correctly do not usually make proper statements in English, so I uploaded my Simple Passive Cashflow podcast to iTunes where I could ramble and honestly talk about what I was going through as an investor.

I began living more consciously, opting into more meaningful engagements with people and projects, and searching for meaning and purpose. I was beginning to ask myself, “after sitting on a beach with my unlimited supply of piña coladas and time…then what!?” Needless to say, my motivation for working in the hostile work environment that I once tolerated dwindled, so I switched to work in the non-profit public sector. I started to see the economic “matrix” where people essentially trade time for money and the rich let others build their dreams.

Being an introvert, it was paradoxically energizing to see my audience grow as I began in-person meetings and online groups I sponsored. I provided hundreds of free coaching sessions to guide newbie investors. With my engineering background and a little “bro-science,” I saw patterns arise in the stories from well-paid professionals who were led into an unfulfilling lifestyle unaligned with their passions. Abolitionist Henry David Thoreau said, “The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them.” People do not have any time to look inwards and are constantly living with anxiety and self-doubts because they are working like machines in order to meet their basic needs without the freedom to find their true passion.

Why did so much hard-work lead to financial scarcity and lack of fulfillment?

This self-selecting group of hard-working professionals searching for more all had a common thread. A moment that pushed them over the edge and made them realize that the path they were on was unacceptable.

These are some of those tipping points:

  • Seeing younger, less experienced workers being “red-circled” as future management and advanced through the company “fast-track”
  • Being fired to cover up shortcomings in a budget
  • Internal theft by upper management
  • An affair by a superior lead to bankruptcy of a startup company affecting many innocent employees
  • Chronic drain of working with deadbeats
  • Getting lost in the office politics of getting your objectives completed when they do not align with your boss’ objectives
  • A retirement party for a coworker is catered with crappy Chinese noodles due to the cost control
  • When you don’t get the job because you do not have enough grey hair
  • Because you have too much grey hair
  • Being criticized for not being business savvy from those who live paycheck to paycheck (when you have a personal portfolio of a few hundred rental units)
  • Sitting through endless meetings that should have been sufficed with an email
  • Circle jerk meetings where the boss’ dumb ideas are exalted by their minions
  • When your boss with no technical experience misuses terms like artificial intelligence, big data, machine learning, and deep learning
  • Being enslaved with the “golden handcuffs”
  • Seeing an ambulance come to the office routinely during layoff season
  • Being around the negative W2 worker speak and adopting the prevailing victim mentality
  • The road warrior gets an early quit on Friday only to see the spouse at home with the pool boy
  • Watching your friends receive the Seiko stainless-steel watch retirement gift

If you have found a calling in something you are good at and truly love doing it…clap, clap, good for you. Keep doing what you are doing and consider yourself lucky. If you relate to any of the moments above, read on.

 

The One Idea

My online journal resulted in many emails of gratitude and acknowledgment because I was empowering people with the “how to” and inspiring them to take a leap of faith to change their financial life forever. I suspect the most effective part of my message was showing people that if little, awkward engineer me could do it, how bad could it be?

I started up-leveling my peer group, and through osmosis, this brought me to a Tony Robbins event where I literally walked on burning coals! There were a multitude of top-down and bottom-up techniques Tony Robbins spoke about during the intensive four-day event. One of those lessons was “things happen for a reason,” and boy, was I glad I did not leave to use the restroom when he outlined the six human needs:

1)         Growth

2)         Contribution

3)         Significance

4)         Uncertainty

5)         Certainty

6)         Love and Connection

Here was the game-changing moment…. Tony Robbins said, “The most important thing is contribution because the secret to living is giving. If you catch onto that, you start realizing that there’s nothing you can get that comes close to what you can give. Life is calling all of us to be more than just about ourselves and that is when we get that spiritual hit.”

Apparently, Mr. Robbins did not endorse the mission of sitting on a beach with an unlimited supply of piña coladas and taking food porn pictures while gallivanting the world as a tourist. Nor did he support playing it safe with a bunch of passive investments.

Later that Easter, I was baptized, and the message there too was “go forth” and help others.

Then another of my mentors, real estate legend Robert Helms, said, “When you are successful you have an obligation to send the elevator back down.” I made it to my penthouse and now I and this elevator are heading back down to get folks!

We all have a finite time on Earth and an empty canvas to create a legacy. This was my one shot! Opting out of the linear path was not about getting financially free and sailing off into the sunset, but it was about standing up for change and creating the greatest impact!

The fan mail all followed a common thread of pain. Many hard-working professionals who are busting their butt on the linear path are being misled down a comfortable life of un-fulfillment. Many of them were enslaved by the “golden handcuffs,” running in the hamster wheel of the day job working for someone else. Some, like doctors, lawyers, dentists, accountants, and engineers make more money to get the big house and nice car, but in the end, they are just a bigger hamster. The dogma of the Wall Street “buy and pray” method is a cover up to insidiously steal investment returns from the people who are doing all the work.

Life is a three-phase screw job:

Phase 1: You enter the workforce with the worst jobs with the lowest pay. Time is abundant.

Phase 2: When marriage and kids enter the picture (and ailing grandparents) this is the time when one should be excelling at their time- consuming career. Money is abundant.

Phase 3: Your teenage kids hate your guts and your health starts to fail. Time is abundant.

 

The Next Chapter

My mission is to teach and empower good people to realize the powerful wealth-building effects of real estate so they can spend their time on more important ventures and passions instead of working long hours and worrying about their financial troubles.

In real estate we use leverage, and by teaching others, I am leveraging other people to achieve their financial goals in hopes that they too will send the elevator back down for the next person.

SimplePassiveCashflow.com seeks to educate those looking for diversification and better returns outside of traditional investments such as mutual funds and stocks. This is part of a large effort to redirect billions of dollars going to the corrupt Wall Street roller coaster and help the shrinking middle-class find safer and more profitable investments in projects that benefit Main Street such as affordable workforce housing rather than luxury housing for the rich.

The true meaning of wealth is having the freedom to do what you want, when you want, and with whom you want. Building cash flow via real estate is the simple part. The difficult part occurs after you are free financially to find your calling and fulfillment. But that’s a great problem to have 😉

116 – Jay Papasan from the One Thing

YouTube Link: https://youtu.be/4K4VFnGpfJo? sub_confirmation 1

Text “simple” to 314-665-1767 to download the Hui Google Drive files and the 2018 Rental Property Analyzer

For a free electronic version of my bestselling book in 12+ categories text the word “ebook” to 587-317-6099.

Please help the show by leaving a review: http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1118795347

Join the Hui Deal Pipeline Club! SimplePassiveCashflow.com/club

Pardon the grammar – I’m an Engeneer, Enginere, Engenere… I’m good with math!

________Here are the Show Notes________

Jay Papasan is a bestselling author, vice president and executive editor at Keller Williams Realty International, and co-owner, alongside his wife Wendy, of the Papasan Properties Group in Austin, Texas. His most recent work with Gary Keller on The ONE Thing has garnered more than 200 appearances on national bestseller lists including #1 on the Wall Street Journal bestseller list. Before joining Keller Williams Realty, Jay served as an editor at HarperCollins Publishers, where he worked on such bestselling books as Body-for-Life by Bill Phillips and Go for the Goal by Mia Hamm.

Jay serves as Gary Keller’s co-author and executive editor on best-selling titles including: The Millionaire Real Estate Agent, The Millionaire Real Estate Investor, SHIFT: How Top Real Estate Agents Tackle Tough Times, FLIP: How to Find, Fix, and Sell Houses for Profit,HOLD: How to Find, Buy, and Rent Houses for Wealth, and The ONE Thing: The Surprisingly Simple Truth Behind Extraordinary Results. He also co-authored SHIFT Commercial.

Best investing books Simplepassivecashflow.com/books

The domino theory – momentum

18-25% total return for SFH

Start small – and go small first fast

Co pairing tasks

Focusing question – what is the one thing I can do that will make everything else go away

411 – annual goals

Work a maze backwards – begin with the end in mind

Counter balance not balanced

When do you stop pushing and start living?

Don’t buy your primary residence

Involving your spouse

Short segments:

 

 

Time is the most important thing… If not now when?

Time is the most important resource. You can trade time for money and vice versa. It is pretty rare that you can not throw money at a problem and make it go away.

Some hacks I have implemented updated 8/1/18 (See how far I have come

  1. Using disposable chopsticks, plates, bowls, clubs, and forks to minimize time to wash dishes and put away. Also need less space for more of this “stuff”. I think we do not realize how much not only time we waste on this but water and electricity go into this.
  2. Use Uber as much as I can to minimize stress, the chance of an accident, 50 cents a mile per the IRS in wear and tear to your vehicle but most importantly you can bring your laptop and get some work done.
  3. Leasing a car – such a great decision. Its fun, the numbers make sense if you are able to grow your money at more than 14% a year, and don’t have to deal with any maintenance issues.
  4. Eat out. It just tastes better too. And no cleanup, prep, grocery shopping, etc.
  5. Send me some of yours!

I stumbled upon a great visualization of your time.  Basically, the yellow below is the time we sleep, blue is leisure, and light blue is at work. See the diagram here http://flowingdata.com/2017/05/09/adulthood-days/

Two takeaways:

  1. If you have not started investing… when the heck when? Get a mentor and compress the learning curve, decrease costly mistakes, and get on with your life!
  2. There is only a limited amount of time to create a legacy… VAs or Virtual Assistants I use.

Fiverr is the world’s largest marketplace of talented online freelancers who pride themselves on
getting things done for you. On time, on budget. Designers, developers, writers – everything you
need for your next project is here. Now let’s tackle your to-dos, today!”

Here is more from Fiverrs website:

“Fiverr’s global community of freelancers have delivered tens of millions of
high-quality Gigs from over 150 service categories across 190 countries.

Fiverr is a global online marketplace offering tasks and services, beginning at a cost of $5 per job
performed. Freelancers use Fiverr to offer services in more than 150 categories, to customers
worldwide. Currently, Fiverr lists more than three million services on its site.
Fiverr is the world’s largest marketplace of talented online freelancers who pride themselves on
getting things done for you. On time, on budget. Designers, developers, writers – everything you need
for your next project is here. Now let’s tackle your to-dos, today!
Join over 11M businesses who use Fiverr’s freelance services.
Fiverr is the world’s home for digital, creative and professional services, providing a one-stop shop
for millions of digital services, all at your fingertips.
Fiverr is a digital marketplace that allows you to make your business better, stay on budget and get
things done in just a click.
Fiverr is the easiest way to get everything done, at an unbeatable value.
Need something now? As the world’s home for digital, creative and professional services, Fiverr
provides one-stop shopping for millions of digital services, all at your fingertips.
Fiverr gives you instant access to millions of Gigs from people who love what they do, in just a click.
Need something done? Let someone else take care of it! Get everything from resume help, to
designed invitations, to cool gifts, all at an affordable price. Whether you’re building a business, or
just looking for something unique, find it on Fiverr!”

Some of you had questions about Virtual Assistants which I have had some growing pains with…

Take 1: I went to various countries/regions Craigslist where I heard there was cheap virtual labor such as the Philippines, Ukraine, Latin America, Eastern Europe, Etc. I created a generic posting for a Virtual Assistant and a link to a Google Form that I created that was supposed to farm data of willing workers and ask binomial questions such as if they had experience with graphics, audio editing, Excel, English, and how much their hourly rate was. This was a success and the idea was that I would create a database that I could BCC the emails to competitively bid projects. Unfortunately, when I sorted my list for the desired skill I was looking for, I discovered that many of the potential candidates sent generic resumes back. They did not even read the job description. I guess as the saying goes “shit in shit out.” Tim Ferriss talks about giving strange instructions to potential job candidates such as a requirement to fax in their application (in an age of limited fax access) to see which candidates follow directions and can overcome minor Resistance of not having fax machines.

Take 2: It seems like the tasks are taking a lot more time than it should. To some respect, that is to be expected. What I am trying to wrap my head around is the cultural differences not to mention the language barrier. In some of these Asian cultures, honor and face are utmost importance and sometimes it is culturally the normal to lie to save face. In America, we preach stepping up and admitting fault and moving on which I believe is a true demonstration of high value. So it’s a little frustrating… I know the internet sucks at these places but give me a break. I am just surprised they are not telling me their dog ate the GoogleDoc. Successful people take ownership and I accept this as MY fault in terms of me not having my job scope defined and linear instructions for the virtual assistant to carry out. If my virtual assistant misses on the deliverable or takes too long I take full responsibility.

Afterthoughts: A great discussion at a recent Mastermind I attended around this topic. Seems like a lot of people are backtracking from cheap (sub 8 dollar an hour labor) and opting for higher quality workers. I believe the vision of an employee is to get something done cheaper than your personal hourly rate, also get it don’t faster, and with a “Sir… I was completing task X and I found this wrong in our process so I took care of it and wanted to discuss this with you.” I don’t know if I will ever achieve this level of initiative in any person trading their time for money but one can only dream. Until then I will try to switch to a more project-based system as opposed to having a VA on call for a 10-40 hour set time. The cons of this project-based methods are that it requires more touch points for me to keep micromanaging each project and this is the exact reason I am looking for help in the first place. Time is the most important thing Jelly Bean. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOksW_NabEk

The Random list of tasks to outsource:

1. Organize your travel (including learning your travel preferences). This includes making all your travel arrangements,
organizing all your flight info into your favorite travel app, and even remotely monitoring your travel to be ready to deal with
any missed flights or oversold hotels.
2. Handle billing disputes.
3. Help setting up bills onto auto payment on your credit card.
4. Address and mail cards, letters, and packages. Sure you may still handwrite the thank you, but do you really need to look up
the address and post the letter?
5. Update your contact manager (or CRM database).
6. Screen your e-mail and handle low-level responses. This includes deleting or archiving things you don’t even need to see.
7. Update your blog and social media accounts.
8. Organize and manage your filing system, both paper-based and scanned e-files.
9. Take dictation (either live or via recordings, perhaps using Voxer, one of my favorite apps).
10. Set up appointments and hold your schedule.
11. Gather all the needed data and prep information for all your appointments. For example, I ask my assistant to put to the
memo of any appointment she posts to my calendar any recent email exchanges and the contact information of the person
I’m meeting with. This saves me untold time when you compound this service over 15-20 meetings I hold each week.
12. Daily clean-up of your office, including refilling items.
13. Screen phone and e-mail so you don’t get the interruptions.
14. Take notes at key meetings and follow up with attendees on key deliverables.
15. Keep a master chart/list/calendar of your projects and deadlines and set reminders.

16. Tickler all birthdays and anniversaries, holidays, or other important dates, and even arrange for gifts, cards, or phone calls
that make you look good.
17. Update his or her own “Project List” so that all the tasks and deliverables they are responsible for in one place for you to
review.
18. Get, open, sort, forward, handle, and if need be shred your mail.
19. Coordinate with outsourced vendors when you have an IT issue. You just work from a back-up computer for the day and let
him or her troubleshoot it with your IT vendor.
20. Order things online for you and handle any product returns or service issues.
21. Handle any personal errands or schedule any household repairs. Yes this is perfectly reasonable as it saves you time that
you can reinvest in creating value for your company.
22. Notarize your documents by becoming a Notary Public in your state.
23. Help you to streamline your office—filing, sorting, and systematizing wworkflow
24. Basic updates to your Web sites.
25. Create and continue to refine the “expert system” for how to be your assistant (this one should be part of their job function
right from the start). This way if you promote your assistant they have created the core system for your next hire. If they leave
you to work elsewhere, the transition is much less painful.
26. Dealing with tech troubles on your phone or tablet computers. They can do this during the day when you’re in the office doing
other more valuable work.
27. Any parts of your projects that he or she is capable of doing for you. Constantly be on the lookout for things to try them out
doing. For example, my assistant helped expand the syndication reach of my business articles by over 100,000 annual
readers.
28. Download movies or audiobooks
29. Search for contacts of people you need to meet
30. Bookkeeping with a CPA or without one
31. Edit videos
32. Make calls
33. FInd sellers
34. Take Calls from leads
35. Call banks to find a portfolio lender
36. Assemble a list of podcast guests to contact

Podcast #113 – Buck Joffrey – Medical Surgeon gets fired and goes into freefall

For the limited offer coaching from Buck and program: Simplepassivecashflow.com/buck

Video Version: https://youtu.be/jq0MhXDEzzA

Audio Version: https://youtu.be/TUmVLqNNtlE

 



Text “simple” to 314-665-1767 to download the Hui Google Drive files and the  2018 Rental Property Analyzer

For a free electronic version of my bestselling book in 12+ categories text the word “ebook” to 587-317-6099.

Please help the show by leaving a review: http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1118795347

Join the Hui Deal Pipeline Club! SimplePassiveCashflow.com/club

Pardon the grammar – I’m an Engeneer, Enginere, Engenere… I’m good with math!

________Here are the Show Notes________

 

We heard you on podcast 17 and you told your story – http://simplepassivecashflow.com/podcast-17-serial-entrepreneur-dr-buck-joffery-wealthformula-podcast/

Hearing your story high paid doctor. Describe yourself as an employee?

Great butt kisser

Lane’s getting fired story

So you were fired what gave you the security to not go back?

Lane’s getting fired story

 

http://richhabits.net/catastrophes-reveal-inner-greatness/?mc_cid=610082b2da&mc_eid=a129173ca3

 

Why professionals are trained to go through the system

 

The two excuses why not to leave the professional system

 

Wealth formula – Mass (money) x Velocity (Leverage) = wealth

 

You need to make money

 

What happen to assisted living project?

 

Taking shots and trying things out? Where is the transition point from taking singles to going to homers?

 

We are talking about Jorge from Simplepassivecashflow.com/ahp

 

SPC listeners are usual creatures. Get me in a room with a bunch of W2 workers talking about their frequent flier miles and their cars and I’m completely turned off. What are your thoughts on coping with this?

 

What are some ways you teach the entrepreneurial spirit with your kids?

 

What if they just want to work for the man or do peace corps?

 

Simplepassivecashflow.com/buck to get the free 1-hour coaching offer from Buck.

—————————————————–

 

Our worst W2 moments which were our Han Solo Moments

 

How to make it as a medical professional? – Kiss Butt 😁

 

We are robots.

 

For more content go to Simplepassivecashflow.com/buck

Podcast #112 – #LaneHack – Fear + How much risk to take + KProxy!

YouTube Link: https://youtu.be/8K4AY4oOAUs? sub_confirmation 1

Text “simple” to 314-665-1767 to download the Hui Google Drive files and the 2018 Rental Property Analyzer

For a free electronic version of my bestselling book in 12+ categories text the word “ebook” to 587-317-6099.

Please help the show by leaving a review: http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1118795347

Join the Hui Deal Pipeline Club! SimplePassiveCashflow.com/club

Pardon the grammar – I’m an Engeneer, Enginere, Engenere… I’m good with math!

________Here are the Show Notes________

The two biggest enemy of success is fear.

It inhibits you from taking action. And nothing happens without that.

Fear, never goes away, no matter how successful you become. Same thing is said about CrossFit workouts… they never get easier. You just plateau to a new level of suck.

The same fear exists for the successful, why don’t they hold them back from taking action?

It made me push to busy my first out of state rental in Birmingham from Seattle, sell my Seattle rentals to 1031 into a dozen out of state properties, and lately moving toward a portfolio of syndicated private placements. I don’t know what’s next?

Successful people simply make a habit of taking action, despite the fear. They have gained the habit/muscle or mental six pack of taking action.

By taking action do you gain the experiences of facing obstacles and overcoming them, facing mistakes and learning from them, taking risks and surviving failure. Gained muscle or even a crazy mental eight pack. You draw upon these experience in times of hardship or difficulty.

Obstacles always change but your ability and track record to move around it is what is most important. When we evaluate people to work with Track-record is always important. Obvious we want to work with someone who is proven but realistically every situation in the future will be different and we are really looking for someone who can deliver despite the obstacles. We are not looking for who is a genius (although it helps) or even with some competitive advantage but mostly good character and ability to overcome obstacles… dare I say turn obstacles to opportunities.

There are a couple leads that have had touch times in their deals lately due to circumstances outside their control. What I know of their mindset is that they are freaking resilient that they will overcome the obstacles.

When crap happens we want say:

“we’ve faced a similar uncertainty before and this was the mistake we made and need to avoid”

“we’ve taken a similar risk before and we survived”

Do not mistaken brazen courage with competence/confidence. There are a lot of people who fake it till they make it.

Risk: If you are in aware of the risks and rewards (mentor/stage 3 of 4 of learning) then take the most risk as possible. The Shape ratio theory that I believe in that the more risk you take the more reward you get exponentially. Therefore take as much risk as you can to capitalize on the most reward. BUT… huge caveat here… only take the most risk that you are willing to take that if the worse that can happen you can live with.

This is why I don’t skydive.

This is why I stick primarily to non-recourse deals where the apartment is stabilized.

proxy service: http://kproxy.com/

Podcast #111 – Interview – Brent Kawakami – Saying NO to a measly $300 a month & Networking on Facebook

YouTube Link: https://youtu.be/dgdMLNq73TM

Text “simple” to 314-665-1767 to download the Hui Google Drive files and the 2018 Rental Property Analyzer

For a free electronic version of my bestselling book in 12+ categories text the word “ebook” to 587-317-6099.

Please help the show by leaving a review: http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1118795347

Join the Hui Deal Pipeline Club! SimplePassiveCashflow.com/club

Pardon the grammar – I’m an Engeneer, Enginere, Engenere… I’m good with math!

________Here are the Show Notes________

1) How much CF are you making today and how are you doing it?
Generally I’ve fluctuate based on buying/selling of real estate. Right now it’s all from passive investments in apartments. My peak was couple thousand a month.
So as I started investigating other investment activities I dabbled in:
P2P investing – Returns were decent (I think I made like 18%), extremely passive once you funded loans. I was fortunate that none of the ones i lended on defaulted so that’s real risk. While you are earning interest payments, it goes back to account so extremely illiquid. You wait out the loan term which can be long. No control. I’d rather do private lending that’s backed by a physical asset.
Dividend stocks – Lot of research, reading investment newsletters, etc. You’re still at the whimsy of the stock market. I could see doing this in future maybe if there’s a crash and you can pick up trophy companies cheap. Again no control.
Gold/silver – I got caught up by the Gold bug rhetoric of “the dollar not backed by anything” “ the crash is coming” “ look how much debt we have” blah blah . A lot of similar stuff you see some Cryptocurrencies saying now. To me you need treat as a store of value and something you don’t care about price. And you need to hold physically. It’s a chaos hedge. But it doesn’t cash flow. And if shit really did hit the fan, you’re not going to need gold, you’re going to need guns, lol.
Internet business (I did sell it later for a small gain). A lot of work…it’s a business. You can get caught up in the 4-hour work week thing, sell your ebook, etc but this takes consistent cultivating like any other business. I had an instance where a change in Google algorithm killed my profit.
Infinite banking (which i’m all in on still) – You’ve had podcasts before on this topic about all the benefits but it’s an amazing vehicle that complements real estate. Personally I don’t think of this as a true investment, it is a savings vehicle. I treat it as my cash war chest and foundation. Downsides to me are that you have to understand and treat as a system otherwise you’ll fail miserably. It’s also literally a lifetime commitment.
Ultimately I settled on real estate starting the single family route in Dallas area (buy, rehab, rent, self manage, etc). I eventually saw the light (What was the light) of multifamily and started investing passively, sold off my single family houses and now a new aspiring sponsor/operator. There’s all the typical things people say (econmies of scale, non-recourse, etc) but my a-ha moment (my 2nd Han Solo moment I guess you could say) was when I started looking for another rental house. I realized adding another $300/mo cashflow wasn’t going to drastically change my life. If I wanted to level up faster, I needed scale faster. Multifamily can do that. When you get a large check for hundreds of thousands from a disposition event on an apartment complex, that’s life changing and can get you places.

(So now you are in the stage where you are doing all the hard work before the success… lets go through this list of things that you are doing… this add value to the listener and maybe we can have a discussion about best practices – Just think in the future when a future investor listens to all the shit you did to get into this)

1) Joined mentorship program (I would rather not say who they were) No problem. Main best practice to me is it’s almost a requirement for MFH. This is a must in addition to all the other education (reading, podcasts, etc)
2) Regularly Contacting brokers/Signing up for lists
3) Evaluating deals
4) Scheduling in-person meetings with with brokers to connect (what did you do). My partner and I specifically reach out to have a meetings at a broker’s office. We’d talk about what we’re doing, looking for, etc and it gave us an opportunity to meet other associates. I’ve tried to do in-person at their office or if I can take them to coffee. For out of town brokers we’d do over phone or if we travel to see a deal (leveraging a current listing of theirs as a talking point to get convo started).
5) Making regular LoopNet rounds
6) Going on property tours
7) Networking on BiggerPockets/LinkedIn/Facebook, etc
8) Going to Meetups, events, and conferences
9) Partnered up with another new sponsor/operator to duplicate efforts, fill gaps, etc (What do you do well and what does he compliment).
My partner is better at making connections and relationships than I am. I’m more analytical and investigative. He’s an eternal optimist, while i’m Mr. Engineer worst case scenario. He can get shiny object syndrome whereas I’m much better at keepings things on task. We’re both at the same level/point in our investing so we have a good synergy with the perspective we’re coming from. One of the things we like is if it takes looking at 100 deals to get 1, maybe us both looking cuts that in half lol.

2) What is your Han Solo moment…

I had two.

1- One was a couple years into my career and i started think there was more than this for 30-40 yrs and began exploring other stuff (as mentioned before)

2- Shift from single family to multifamily. My a-ha moment mentioned before.

3) Worst life/business moment what did you do a er? Lesson learned?

I’ve had those crappy issues that come up with rentals, like plumbing issues, tenant issues, foundation issues, etc which sucked. Although one big one was not listening to my wife about a single family house. I had a tenant turnover in one of my rentals and I had been mulling about selling and focusing on multifamily. Instead of listening to my wife who encouraged that, I did the easy thing which was find a new tenant. I had gotten so in the routine and it was the easy option even though I knew I was ready to step into next thing. It ended up being my worst tenant ever (she paid but was really needy) and a headache. I ultimately sold it a few months later.

Lesson learned: Listen to your wife more. While she isn’t involved directly in the nuts and bolts, she is a better judge of character and intangibles in both myself and others.

4) Current 2‐week experiment and 6‐month project? (90‐180 day goal) A mark of a high performer is to put your ego aside and accept the help of others and mastermind maybe folks can help you by you asking.

2-week: Let’s see when we get there. Lot of personal type things likely going on (not sure if that’s valuable for your audience?)

6-month: Sponsor a 75+ unit, class b/c apartment. That’s my one thing.

5) What is your simple passive Cashflow number? Now imagine you had 2x that amount… Describe your ideal day, detailed rou ne, and what projects you are working on.

6) Something that you have recently or thought about “burning your cash” on for me savings or an improvement in quality of life.

Meal service, not the recipe in the box but the fully prepared, proportioned individual meals. I enjoy cooking but not thinking about what I have to eat is something that I find makes my day easier, especially now that I have a baby. It’s just fuel, i can eat the same thing everyday and be fine. Plus it helps me stay on the straight line nutrition wise.

There’s a good book on this topic called Happy Money I recommend.

7) Something that you changed your mind on? Our ego o en gets in the way of greatness.

2 Things:

1. I used to think of insurance for the financial aspects only but now I think about the riders, disability kickers, etc. Having a kid changes your thought process so now i’m more thoughtful about things like insurance, estate planning, etc. I’m still behind on that stuff, but now these long term planning things are in my thoughts.

2) Owning a house isn’t a big deal. We recently sold our house and moved to an apartment for a number of reasons…yada yada yada. I’m not full Grant Cardone though.

8) In this sellers market… what are you inves ng in? What should a someone who does not have a substan al level of cashflow yet be inves ng in?

My cash value life insurance/infinite banking strategy is my core foundation. I see that as the warchest and can let me sit on “cash” without losing too much. I’m obviously still actively pursuing multifamily, it’s harder of course with the current market, but deals can be found in all markets.

Nothing wrong with being patient if you think things are frothy. 100% of nothing is better than any percent of a bad deal. Being patient is the hardest thing.

brent@hellomultifamily.com

Podcast #108 – Rocky Lalvani recalls 2000 & 2008 corrections and regrets not getting started earlier with a little marriage family advice

YouTube Link: https://youtu.be/v0fB-e3579E

Text “simple” to 314-665-1767 to download the Hui Google Drive files and the 2018 Rental Property Analyzer

Please help the show by leaving a review: http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1118795347

Join the Hui Deal Pipeline Club! SimplePassiveCashflow.com/club

Pardon the grammar – I’m an Engeneer, Enginere, Engenere… I’m good with math! Here are the Show Notes:
Currently have 5 rentals and 80k of income and trying to paying off rentals because near retirement
Also flips properties where the goal is 20k profit
He outsources much of the work
Got rentals in 2011 and regret not doing it earlier
Got hammered in 2008
Got out of the market in 2000
Interest rates are very low which is different that past times which means a good time to lock in loans, stocks are pretty high
Real estate is not for everyone and might have a wrong skill set
If you don’t want to do the work be a hard money flipper but only make 10% (you need to have the money)
Don’t lend to someone doing their first flip
Need to hire a virtual assistant – 5 properties can manage by self
Let go of politics
Marriage advice
Begin with the end in mind – He already knows his legacy and just lives it
Teaching kids financial principals – mindsets and habits
To teach a 12-year-old – give them money
To teach a 30-year-old – they need to want to fix the money problem
Letting go to be happy
richersoul.com

Financial Planners & the Death of the “Fiduciary Rule”

This topic really fires me up! Here is a little humorous video to lighten the mood. Warning its going to be 20 minutes so better put the sign on your desk saying you are “away at the toilet” or “away at lunch.”

I’m not a fan of Suze Orman/Dave Ramsey because of their scarcity/fugal money saving ideas but for some people who can’t seem to save two pennies to save their life, I guess it is better than nothing. 

Suze’s WTF face @4:41 when the caller says their financial planner recommended buying an annuity. (that would net a 5% commission!)

@4:00 – Financial advisors make commissions and often put you in investments that are best for them.

Obama tried to do a good thing and pass a law where all financial professionals (like brokers and insurance agents) had to adhere to the “fiduciary” standards—meaning they’d have to work in your best interest if they were advising you on your retirement investments. But this died recently and there is no more fiduciary rule – https://www.wsj.com/articles/fiduciary-rule-dealt-blow-by-circuit-court-ruling-1521164915

Federal Department of Licencing discussion on conflicts of interest or kickbacks to the tune of $17 billion – https://www.dol.gov/newsroom/releases/ebsa/ebsa20160406-0

I don’t recommend any financial planner because I don’t take financial advice who is still working for a paycheck and not out of the rat race (lives in their parent’s basement) but if you must go with one of my friends or a flat-fee one – http://www.fpany.org/

I have heard of these guys/gals do their sales pitch and use fear-based words like “diversity”, “security” and “risk” where the 25-year-old kid is trying to sell random investments to me. And don’t get me started when I tried to tell them about the being your own bank concept. #FacePalm They just tried to sell a higher return (6% whoop-ti-doo) with no liquidity. Totally not what I was going for. Not saying these guys are bad people, they just don’t know and products of the Wall Street institutions.

“It’s like a lawyer who only sets you up with only a will (and not a living trust) because they know you will come to them for probate which will cost on average 10-30k for most people. Talk about BS!”

Note: When I call out financial planners I am also calling out brokers and insurance salespeople. Repeat never listen to a broker!

Share this with your co-workers & friends/family that still believe in the Easter Bunny (happy pre-Easter!) and have a false sense of security in what this financial planner says.

Who took all my money?!? We are living in the best time to be alive with all this information at our fingertips.

Why do people still choose to follow the advice from financial planners working for a commission or so-called low-cost index funds that have about a million middlemen taking the majority of your returns? Who knows, probably why 10% of people in this test are still using the “pull out method” as their form of birth control?

A little off topic but just making sure you are still awake there because financial education is very important.

Check out this podcast with a CFP telling us of the insider secrets in the industry. Link

Speaking of less know tricks… Last year I learned this cool financial hack utilized by the smart money. By being your own bank and using the “Infinite Banking Concept” you can create a dividend-paying whole life insurance. Its called life insurance but its just a tax code loophole to make a tax free yield in an account that is sheltered from lawsuits and creditors. I can assure you this is another thing you financial advisor or life insurance sales guys just does not get… likely because they are still working for a paycheck and it actually decreases their commissions.

Go to SimplePassiveCashflow.com/banking for more info.

And for you high net-worth professions still dabbling in paper assets you won’t want to miss this other trick that I will reveal on there too.

Financial advisers and portfolio managers get paid no matter what.

They make money by taking a percentage of your portfolio called an asset management fee. They have skin in the game.

Here’s how it works when things are good and the tide is floating all boats:

  • Your manager creates your portfolio but doesn’t really out preform the index funds
  • You have a gain and your manager takes 1% of that sum.
But in a bear market this is how it works:
  • Your manager cannot save you from a market downturn because they don’t put you in hard assets (cause they can’t get paid off of it)
  • You lose 20% of your nest eff and yet your manager takes 1% of the sum.
  • They still invite your to the customer appreciation party 😉

In bad times these managers rarely take any blame. Conventional conversation says nobody could see a downturn and we were dollar-cost averaging anyway.

If the market is good, they can take full credit for their supposed management skills.

They try to make things confusing with their complex trading systems which no one can explain in order to glorify their position and allow you to just let them drive.

No one really gets rich with Wall Street investing other than the insiders. Not retail, mainstream investors. As real estate investors, we do not buy retail (turnkey is sort of retail) but syndications and private placements are not retail.

I only invest in things that make sense. Where the income has to exceed the expenses. And where there is a forced appreciation (not market appreciation componet) where you have control over your destiny.

In the end, you want to buy direct as possible. Buying REITS is the same thing as buying mutual funds with a bunch of middlemen. Crowdfunding sites remove a few layers but as a syndication working with a Crowdfunding site is very expensive way of acquiring capital. Sometimes I wonder who are the people using this high cost of private equity… Perhaps they are “desperate syndicators?”