Podcast #111 – Interview – Brent Kawakami – Saying NO to a measly $300 a month & Networking on Facebook

YouTube Link: https://youtu.be/dgdMLNq73TM

Text “simple” to 314-665-1767 to download the Hui Google Drive files and the 2018 Rental Property Analyzer

For a free electronic version of my bestselling book in 12+ categories text the word “ebook” to 587-317-6099.

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Pardon the grammar – I’m an Engeneer, Enginere, Engenere… I’m good with math!

________Here are the Show Notes________

1) How much CF are you making today and how are you doing it?
Generally I’ve fluctuate based on buying/selling of real estate. Right now it’s all from passive investments in apartments. My peak was couple thousand a month.
So as I started investigating other investment activities I dabbled in:
P2P investing – Returns were decent (I think I made like 18%), extremely passive once you funded loans. I was fortunate that none of the ones i lended on defaulted so that’s real risk. While you are earning interest payments, it goes back to account so extremely illiquid. You wait out the loan term which can be long. No control. I’d rather do private lending that’s backed by a physical asset.
Dividend stocks – Lot of research, reading investment newsletters, etc. You’re still at the whimsy of the stock market. I could see doing this in future maybe if there’s a crash and you can pick up trophy companies cheap. Again no control.
Gold/silver – I got caught up by the Gold bug rhetoric of “the dollar not backed by anything” “ the crash is coming” “ look how much debt we have” blah blah . A lot of similar stuff you see some Cryptocurrencies saying now. To me you need treat as a store of value and something you don’t care about price. And you need to hold physically. It’s a chaos hedge. But it doesn’t cash flow. And if shit really did hit the fan, you’re not going to need gold, you’re going to need guns, lol.
Internet business (I did sell it later for a small gain). A lot of work…it’s a business. You can get caught up in the 4-hour work week thing, sell your ebook, etc but this takes consistent cultivating like any other business. I had an instance where a change in Google algorithm killed my profit.
Infinite banking (which i’m all in on still) – You’ve had podcasts before on this topic about all the benefits but it’s an amazing vehicle that complements real estate. Personally I don’t think of this as a true investment, it is a savings vehicle. I treat it as my cash war chest and foundation. Downsides to me are that you have to understand and treat as a system otherwise you’ll fail miserably. It’s also literally a lifetime commitment.
Ultimately I settled on real estate starting the single family route in Dallas area (buy, rehab, rent, self manage, etc). I eventually saw the light (What was the light) of multifamily and started investing passively, sold off my single family houses and now a new aspiring sponsor/operator. There’s all the typical things people say (econmies of scale, non-recourse, etc) but my a-ha moment (my 2nd Han Solo moment I guess you could say) was when I started looking for another rental house. I realized adding another $300/mo cashflow wasn’t going to drastically change my life. If I wanted to level up faster, I needed scale faster. Multifamily can do that. When you get a large check for hundreds of thousands from a disposition event on an apartment complex, that’s life changing and can get you places.

(So now you are in the stage where you are doing all the hard work before the success… lets go through this list of things that you are doing… this add value to the listener and maybe we can have a discussion about best practices – Just think in the future when a future investor listens to all the shit you did to get into this)

1) Joined mentorship program (I would rather not say who they were) No problem. Main best practice to me is it’s almost a requirement for MFH. This is a must in addition to all the other education (reading, podcasts, etc)
2) Regularly Contacting brokers/Signing up for lists
3) Evaluating deals
4) Scheduling in-person meetings with with brokers to connect (what did you do). My partner and I specifically reach out to have a meetings at a broker’s office. We’d talk about what we’re doing, looking for, etc and it gave us an opportunity to meet other associates. I’ve tried to do in-person at their office or if I can take them to coffee. For out of town brokers we’d do over phone or if we travel to see a deal (leveraging a current listing of theirs as a talking point to get convo started).
5) Making regular LoopNet rounds
6) Going on property tours
7) Networking on BiggerPockets/LinkedIn/Facebook, etc
8) Going to Meetups, events, and conferences
9) Partnered up with another new sponsor/operator to duplicate efforts, fill gaps, etc (What do you do well and what does he compliment).
My partner is better at making connections and relationships than I am. I’m more analytical and investigative. He’s an eternal optimist, while i’m Mr. Engineer worst case scenario. He can get shiny object syndrome whereas I’m much better at keepings things on task. We’re both at the same level/point in our investing so we have a good synergy with the perspective we’re coming from. One of the things we like is if it takes looking at 100 deals to get 1, maybe us both looking cuts that in half lol.

2) What is your Han Solo moment…

I had two.

1- One was a couple years into my career and i started think there was more than this for 30-40 yrs and began exploring other stuff (as mentioned before)

2- Shift from single family to multifamily. My a-ha moment mentioned before.

3) Worst life/business moment what did you do a er? Lesson learned?

I’ve had those crappy issues that come up with rentals, like plumbing issues, tenant issues, foundation issues, etc which sucked. Although one big one was not listening to my wife about a single family house. I had a tenant turnover in one of my rentals and I had been mulling about selling and focusing on multifamily. Instead of listening to my wife who encouraged that, I did the easy thing which was find a new tenant. I had gotten so in the routine and it was the easy option even though I knew I was ready to step into next thing. It ended up being my worst tenant ever (she paid but was really needy) and a headache. I ultimately sold it a few months later.

Lesson learned: Listen to your wife more. While she isn’t involved directly in the nuts and bolts, she is a better judge of character and intangibles in both myself and others.

4) Current 2‐week experiment and 6‐month project? (90‐180 day goal) A mark of a high performer is to put your ego aside and accept the help of others and mastermind maybe folks can help you by you asking.

2-week: Let’s see when we get there. Lot of personal type things likely going on (not sure if that’s valuable for your audience?)

6-month: Sponsor a 75+ unit, class b/c apartment. That’s my one thing.

5) What is your simple passive Cashflow number? Now imagine you had 2x that amount… Describe your ideal day, detailed rou ne, and what projects you are working on.

6) Something that you have recently or thought about “burning your cash” on for me savings or an improvement in quality of life.

Meal service, not the recipe in the box but the fully prepared, proportioned individual meals. I enjoy cooking but not thinking about what I have to eat is something that I find makes my day easier, especially now that I have a baby. It’s just fuel, i can eat the same thing everyday and be fine. Plus it helps me stay on the straight line nutrition wise.

There’s a good book on this topic called Happy Money I recommend.

7) Something that you changed your mind on? Our ego o en gets in the way of greatness.

2 Things:

1. I used to think of insurance for the financial aspects only but now I think about the riders, disability kickers, etc. Having a kid changes your thought process so now i’m more thoughtful about things like insurance, estate planning, etc. I’m still behind on that stuff, but now these long term planning things are in my thoughts.

2) Owning a house isn’t a big deal. We recently sold our house and moved to an apartment for a number of reasons…yada yada yada. I’m not full Grant Cardone though.

8) In this sellers market… what are you inves ng in? What should a someone who does not have a substan al level of cashflow yet be inves ng in?

My cash value life insurance/infinite banking strategy is my core foundation. I see that as the warchest and can let me sit on “cash” without losing too much. I’m obviously still actively pursuing multifamily, it’s harder of course with the current market, but deals can be found in all markets.

Nothing wrong with being patient if you think things are frothy. 100% of nothing is better than any percent of a bad deal. Being patient is the hardest thing.

brent@hellomultifamily.com

Quantitative Tightening in Early 2019

Quantitative Easing created $3.5 trillion from 2009 to 2014

Now “Quantitative Tightening” is coming and will drain liquidity from markets

No launch date but says late 2018 but here is the Fed’s schedule

 

Do I think there will be a slight correction but the FED is trying to get back some “dry powder” to be able to stop a monumental slide? If there is a 10% plus correction the FED will go back to QE3-QE4.

In the end, don’t freak out just buy investments that are undervalued. If you are new well sorry you need a mentor or you need to push through lukewarm turnkey deals as fast as possible.

Podcast #108 – Rocky Lalvani recalls 2000 & 2008 corrections and regrets not getting started earlier with a little marriage family advice

YouTube Link: https://youtu.be/v0fB-e3579E

Text “simple” to 314-665-1767 to download the Hui Google Drive files and the 2018 Rental Property Analyzer

Please help the show by leaving a review: http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1118795347

Join the Hui Deal Pipeline Club! SimplePassiveCashflow.com/club

Pardon the grammar – I’m an Engeneer, Enginere, Engenere… I’m good with math! Here are the Show Notes:
Currently have 5 rentals and 80k of income and trying to paying off rentals because near retirement
Also flips properties where the goal is 20k profit
He outsources much of the work
Got rentals in 2011 and regret not doing it earlier
Got hammered in 2008
Got out of the market in 2000
Interest rates are very low which is different that past times which means a good time to lock in loans, stocks are pretty high
Real estate is not for everyone and might have a wrong skill set
If you don’t want to do the work be a hard money flipper but only make 10% (you need to have the money)
Don’t lend to someone doing their first flip
Need to hire a virtual assistant – 5 properties can manage by self
Let go of politics
Marriage advice
Begin with the end in mind – He already knows his legacy and just lives it
Teaching kids financial principals – mindsets and habits
To teach a 12-year-old – give them money
To teach a 30-year-old – they need to want to fix the money problem
Letting go to be happy
richersoul.com

Podcast #107 – Fundamentals – The MFH Broker who takes flowers to 80-year-old ladies and the brokers point of view from Mark Allen

YouTube Link: https://youtu.be/25UY_v17bt4

Text “simple” to 314-665-1767 to download the Hui Google Drive files and the 2018 Rental Property Analyzer

Please help the show by leaving a review: http://getpodcast.reviews/id/1118795347

Join the Hui Deal Pipeline Club! SimplePassiveCashflow.com/club

Pardon the grammar – I’m an Engeneer, Enginere, Engenere… I’m good with math! Here are the Show Notes:
Mark Allen is a broker
Started in 2009 and went to Westpoint Academy
Got a $35k loan to get started in FL
Started with subject to or assuming the loan method of acquisition
2015-2016 sold initial properties and started flipping properties while working the day job
lead to MFH
Saved the money from flips and day job to go into MFH
You can find Mark at SVN and check out his podcast
ROI on time is more for Commercial than residential
Provide value by driving properties, pictures, transaction beat
Yadi matrix, co-star offer owner data
Face to face is better than email or phone
Bring 80-year-old sellers flowers
once or every two months a touch point with some value
As an investor go right to the broker and all of them
CCIM is a higher level designation (but that’s your job as an investor to know what a deal is)
Loopnet/correct C is a good way to find active brokers who are perhaps hungry
SVN, Marcus, Colliers, JLL, CBRE are popular brokers
Call brokers and introduce yourself
Share pitch deck with broker and share team so you show that you are credible

April 18 & 19, 2018 – See you in Chicago

 

On April 18 & 19, 2018 I will be attending notebuyerbootcamp.com in Chicago-Land!

Why the heck am I going to a note buyer conference? Have I got shiny object syndrome again?

Not to worry I am speaking on a panel about raising private equity 😛

Use $200 off coupon code “SimplePassive”

One takeaway I have gotten from the past couple months of open phone calls with your folks is that after turn-key (SFH) rentals, your natural progression is to forge a path on either syndication as a LP, BRRRRs, or non-performing notes. In that order of popularity from my unscientific study.

If you make it out there… I’ll buy the first drink!

__________Event Information_________

AHP’s CEO Jorge Newbery and 10-years of contacts will gather to share what they have learned about NPL (non-performing loan) investing in order to inspire a new breed of note investors – those who want to achieve superior financial returns and an extraordinary social impact.

Come to learn and connect with some of the leading note investors in our country! It doesn’t matter if you’re new to note buying or a seasoned vet, you will learn step by step how to build & scale a note buying business.

 

Attached is ALN Market Stats

Attached is ALN Market Stats
 
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sD7E8Z8rY_3W3WZmDBIlrf7xDBYi_pYE
 
-Occupancy
-Rent Increases
 
I personally don’t read too much into these stats because they are for typical deals. You should be buying deals with stories behind them that transcend these stats. But you can rank on MSA from another so there is some value to doing that.

Podcast #94 – Fundamentals – Ask Lane: MFH latest underwriting hacks, GP/LP Splits, reading an executive summary, mobile homes

Stories from my SFH portfolio… Show notes below:

One of my longest tenants went AWOL. 🙁

“They did send in a partial payment of  $965 that we received on Monday..  They now owe for January and $385 past due.  for a total of $1,263  I am not sure why they are being so uncooperative for the inspection”

A couple weeks later…

“She has been in the hospital again.  I gave her our direct number and she said she will call.  She is also supposed to bring the late part and will bringing last months rent in about a week and half.  She apologized for the trouble of getting her, but she was not able to return calls.”

I like to work through and with my property management.

They alerted me of the issue.

“Seems like valid reason for being late. Maybe we can ask for hospital invoice or doctor note just for record keeping. We might submit to the potential seller to explain the gap in the rent rolls. That way we can verify it too. “

Rats!

The dishwasher stopped working in this home.  It looks like it needs a new sprayer arm and wire harness for $285.89.  But the bigger picture is there are rodents in the home that chewed the wires.  See pictures.

We will need the approval to repair the dishwasher but first, we will also need to get a quote for rodent removal.  The quotes for rodent removal are free so I will send someone out to see how extensive the rodent issue is.  I will keep you updated and we will go from there.

Our tech went to this property and reported the following:

dishwasher model# gz8945pg35 wire harness was chewed by rodents also spray arm has burn spots estimate for repair $285.89

Sign up for the Hui Deal Pipeline Club to get access to a Sears pricing list to see how my you are getting screwed for by your property management.

Our tech made a temporary fix to wires so dishwasher is working now.  We also recommend to do something about rodents otherwise they may cause more issue….

But hey just got my AHP and private lending not monthly payment J

Mold in one of my properties

Buying a drone-

For the past few years I have been amazed the amazing drone shots.

J Martin posted some shots in Changmai, Thailand and I started to ask him which one he used. Basically there are two of them that everyone gets one that is mobile and in 1080p (300) the other which is larger and in 4K (1000).

I’ve been adding videos to our YouTube channel and think that the 4K is where the future is. I’m making the leap to get the 1000 dollar version. I also am going to consider it a business purchase so I can get a nice entrepreneur discount too. Sometimes I think in amazement how crazy that would be to buy such a toy for a miser like myself. But then I figure I would take cool shots for our investor club when I do due diligence. How cool would it be to take shot of drilling rigs for exploratory drilling? Yup we are going there.

A couple of years ago when we were working our first project in Iowa which we ultimately dropped we did some video and it really brought the project to life.

As a side note, I had shinny object syndrome kick in and thought I would be able to make videos for other companies. Imagine I could go to a CrossFit and record their outdoor workout or go to a wedding (and get free food).

Then I thought that I could get a dime a dozen (commodity employee) or Millennial good with computers to do the tedious editing for me.

But then I stopped myself. But the whole mental exercise brought insight about what I want to ultimately hit my Simple Passive Cashflow number when you work on things for joy and engagement. What better to help people share awesome visuals and be around people on their special day like a wedding or birthday party.

So I heard Uncle Buck Joffrey started intermittent fasting a few months ago and lost 40 lbs. I started doing IF when I started renting out my first home in 2010. I can remember reading the ebook “eat stop eat”.

Ralph Waldo Emerson
“The first wealth is health.”

I needed to step my game up so I decided to find a personal trainer. So stay tuned for that. After spending 60k in 2016 and 30k in 2017 on training and mentorship I truly see the value of it. Of course, as you know I am someone who takes action. I can also say being on the other end mentoring you guys in my paid coaching program that it’s neat seeing the barriers broken. Honestly, I don’t feel like I do much but the results are amazing. As an ex crossfit coach myself, if you would asked me if paying someone 90 dollars to count my reps and pass me the weights… I would have thought you were crazy. But now I get it!

Wanted to share a trend that I have been seeing in the past 6 months in MFH (idk how it manifests in sfh?)

The class c assets are getting beat down by cap rate compression (delta between cap rate and interest rates) and therefore a lot of the experienced investors are getting into class b because the per cost unit is getting pretty much the same. This is moving away from the normal business plan for turning class c to b. The thought is… heck might as well go for the 1980s build instead of 1960-1970s stuff for the same price. Having a newer asset might also be a little more conservative way to go with this stage in the market cycles because in a correction A will move to B… And B will move to C and the lower class D/C in the tertiary areas will see most of the vacancy or rent concessions.

Hurricanes:

I got to pondering looking back when New Orleans was hit by Hurricane Katrina there were short-term disruptions to gas prices especially since Houston is a major think tank for the metro industry. I expect Federal money which might have been focused on (helicopter money) be spent on infrastructure spending or tax cuts NOW be redirected to damage recovery.. Which will manifest as tax breaks, loan subsidies, or other incentives offered to entice investment capital to flow into affected markets.

Definitely an opportunity in the short term to go in there and develop to take advantage of the fiscally earmarked casually funds.

As a long-term buy hold investor what I am keying in on is what the big institutional players (like insurance companies) will do. I suspect they will actually have to pony up and pay claims in Houston and Florida which will divert funding away from their Plan A: financing new class A multi-family apartments in other markets. This results in less new developments coming online which is great for Class B and C mfh investors who have been struggling with the recent cap rate compression.

Other random thoughts:

  1. Low / no equity homeowners will walk from their properties and focus on rebuilding their lives as renters for the next 2 years. These foreclosures will certainly impact values in numerous communities throughout Houston.2. Many insurance companies will re-think the coastal markets and their policy premiums for same. This, along with the inevitable increase in flood insurance premiums will also impact buying power for future homeowners.3. Landlords will be in demanding higher rents as there will be a shortage of housing for the next year or while properties are rebuilt.

    4. Long-term impact can only be speculated on since this was an epic storm that caused billions in damage to homes, autos and businesses but those purchasing SFR’s better buy very, very low or they could be the next distressed sellers.

Changes in MFH Underwriting and getting deals

I’ve had some hurdles here.  It seems the standards in submitting LOI’s have been changing the past 9 months. What changes have you been seeing from the front line?

1/ Business conditions are dictating POF with the LOI.   Based on the latest sophisticated investors are underwriting deals with 80/20 terms,  1% interest only and 1.25 DSCR.

It’s becoming more common for brokers to review the buyers’ underwriting before accepting an LOI to present to the sellers.  The brokers view these terms as aggressive and are reluctant to submit my LOI.  It matters who your lender because it comes down to team and a portion of it is your lender.  Large deals have been falling out of escrow due to over-aggressive underwriting that cannot find financing.  Las Vegas lenders are underwriting at 65/35 LTV, 1.3 DSCR.  You can change your underwriting to match Las Vegas standards, giving brokers more comfort, and therefore remain on the ‘A’ list or do nothing.

A lot of time you will needs POF with the LOI.  Use an angel… anyone who is an ‘Angel’ on the LOI, will be given the option to KP and co-sponsor ( if qualified ) the deal if the LOI is accepted.  The average $/unit for a C-class, value-add, stabilized asset in a C to B- area is $55-85K.  The POF for a 200 unit property at the top end is $5.95M.

2/  Post close liquidity equal to 10% of the loan.

3/  Proof of net worth equal to the value of the property.

4/  Hard money; the standard is becoming 1% of the purchase price (I haven’t submitted an LOI with hard money yet; .5% hard money and see if that places me in best and final).

Question: I heard you say in the podcast that you have a team in Atlanta. How did you go about building a team there? Is there a podcast episode on that?

I think it’s no secret that as the sellers market matures, turnkey properties not in war-zones are becoming endangered species. When I began picking these things up in 2013 you could get inside the loop highway (under an hour commute to the city center) and get a 1980-1990s product. Now you are looking outside of the loop highway and in 1940-1960 properties. The good turnkey providers are frankly making more money selling to retail buyers than us cheapo investors who has got a million questions. The stuff I see coming out on most lists are properties that you would not want to buy. Unless you have someone boots on the group (who is not trying to sell you) and is agnostic to the transaction, you are going in blind to a loaded minefield.

I am beginning to leverage my contacts and finding investor focused real estate agents who know what to look for in a rental property. This effectively cuts out the middleman in the transaction but it requires you to know what you are doing in the first place (two to four transactions or a mentor) so you can coach your agent and arrange for contractors. You find one person who is good you find the others because good people associate with good people.

I feel like the SimplePassiveCashflow Facebook group has reached a tipping point where everything you need from a peer investor network is here. You just have to go about it the right way. One wrong way I see it done and I see it done in other groups and BiggerPockets is being an “ask-hole”. Asking a one off question and not contributing to the community is a sure way to get crickets and a one off answer. But you miss the point, which is to build a relationship. Put your perspective goggles on and think… how can I add value to someone or others? What do they need?

So my call to action is if you want to team up with me and help me source properties and teams let me know. The rest please stand by for PML deals and others on the Hui Deal Pipeline club.

We need to stick together and work collectively. As a Hui. I know what happens when you read a few websites and podcasts and go it Rambo style because I did it myself when I first got started. You will get eaten by the sharks and you won’t know what got taken from you. You leave so much money on the table that you don’t realize a couple years down the road.

I don’t want to discourage anyone from not buying because at the end of the day even with the prices as they are it’s still better than the equity markets. I currently believe that there is a 50% chance we will see a recession in the next three years so keep investing just as long as the numbers make sense. If you don’t know the numbers or think you know get someone to help.

Where do you think the crossover point is?

I am talked to over a couple hundred people over the past year and for those people SAVING less than 30K per year after their day job should invest in rentals or turnkey rentals in a market like kansas city, memphis, atlanta, birmingham, not seattle, san francisco, california…

The short term goal is to gain landlord/acquisition knowledge and build a cashflow base of a couple thousand every month. But once you achieve that you should step up to larger passive partnerships/syndications because the return to pain in the butt ratio is greater. People who call/email/write on forums fail to see this two phase journey. People hear the benefits of MFH and come up with the ridiculous 1000 unit goal when they have not even see if they are borrowing material on their first buy and hold. Eventually, a lot of people quite a fizzle out while starting out on the MFH road when they should have done sfh and this insight.

As much as I advocate for “simple” I am really an advocate for the minimal effective dose to maximize returns with minimal effort.

So I’m trying to learn how to evaluate syndications as a passive investor. I was looking to a deal that was presented to me near your last one and I ran a quick analysis. What do you think?

CONS:

– 1990s build A class than B/C Class @ 120k per door and value-add reposition is from B/C to A, risky at this market cycle in event of a recession and rent contraction (Usually we are buying at 45-65K a door with a stabilized building that have over 90% occupancy)

– Loan is 80.25% LTV -> too high? – (This is not really a factor – you want to be borrowing as much as you can and this is why you are going with such syndication to buy in bulk with others and get better terms. When looking at the loan you need to look at the term such as loan length, if it is recourse or non-recourse, and pre-payment terms)

– Loan is 36 months -> dangerous in this cycle (5 years and less is dangerous, just closed on a property in OKC for 10 year 4.22% 3 year interest only)

PROS:

– Sponsors experienced – how did you verify this? (Talking to investors who were in past deals. Relying on my network to discuss reputation and character. Note: This is not going to be completed by emails or phone calls.)

– Investor waterfall favourable – (Waterfalls create complexity and typically they mean less returns for the passives. Generally, the best terms for investors is a simple 80/20 or 70/30 split. Waterfalls raise a red flag for me. I have seen people balk from a high sponsor fee but that is just one thing, if it’s a deal then the sponsor should be able to take what they want. A deal is something that is underwritten very conservatively – see below)

Based on my limited and growing knowledge, I wouldn’t invest in this deal if I had the funds. What do you think?

(You are scratching the surface of these: A true analysis of the deal requires you to have income and loss statements and rent rolls going back 12 months and possibly 36 months. This is where analysis totally differs from SFH or units under a dozen. Another part is to analyze the rental comps because 90% of the projections are based on the proforma rents per square footage. A lot of smoke and mirrors can be used by leads and brokers to inflate this number. Comps need to be verified and it is really a touchy feely thing. It cannot be a feeling on hey this 1985 property looks like this 1987 property on the westside of the train tracks looks like I can get $1.12/Rent per SF. Warning…I have see a lot of garbage underwriting play with annual rent increases 2.5%+ a year, expenses increase less than inflation – under 2% annual increases, and total rent increases of over 18% – this is something Patrickherbig.com has really opened my eyes too.  Past performance is not an indicator of success and 2012-2016 anyone could have made money if you were in the right place.)

I saw the last deal you did was at a 70/30 as opposed to 80/20, which is what I understand to be the generally accepted industry standard for syndications.  How do you think about evaluating deals with respect to the profit split, both from the investor and the sponsor perspective?  I’m trying to understand the situations where a “below market” upside would be acceptable and how the sponsors decide what structure to use – is it just based on supply/demand and the reputation of the deal sponsors (ie the sponsors/GPs will make the deal as favorable to them vs the LPs as possible while still being able to attract investors)?

I see a lot of yahoos doing 70/30 splits with silly assumptions like 1% expenses increases and expectations of over 20% bump in rents. I also see a lot of 80/20 and 90/10 deals that are run by folks with long and short track records. Beware of a person with a nice suit. I think I need to personally show up better because of people never the less associate a shinny pdf deck and cool bio page as reliability or perceived value. I would not really look at the GP/LP splits. The way I see it if it’s a great deal then we as LPs should have a large room for error and heck yea the GP should be taking a large cut. But things get muddled by the assumptions the GP is using and quite frankly unless you have analyzed 100-200 large MFH properties and put in a few LOIs I don’t think you will be able to see where the red flags are. There is a YouTube video “Bear and basketball awareness test” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ahg6qcgoay4 where you get fixated on this split stuff and forget the fundamentals of the deal.

Thoughts on mobile home parks/ self-storage?

I recognize as both still being in the real estate category as a good way to diversify away from Real Estate in a heated market. I admit I don’t know much about the two, especially self-storage. From what I have gathered from other investors the Cashflow in Mobile homes is a little higher but there is not as explosive upside as apartments. This upside is really never captured in a conservative proforma anyway. Mobile home parks are a not being made and in times of correction, they are going to be in very high demand.

I have been looking at some mobile home parks and talking to a bunch of you if you are more interested in either a single asset higher risk/reward mobile home park or a more diversified play of multiple parks in one.

Some 2018 Trends

The ULI annual forecast is really comprehensive and great bathroom read:
 
Takeways:
-Interesting points brought up on different age generations
-What international countries are bringing in investment dollars
-What cites have the highest oversupply
-Trends in natural disasters
-Where home building is hot
-Homeownership rates
-Student Housing trends are going down
Let me know if you are interested in attending a 2018 trends webinar that is 10x this! Sign up below to get access!